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Early Bronco coyote Swap

coyote-air-inlet

Early Bronco coyote Swap

Dropping a Coyote  Engine into a Vintage Bronco

What do you do when you have a vintage Bronco and want stronger V-8 power? You probably look to Mustang engines. But what if you already have a hot rod pony powerplant and want more?

 

Perhaps a Coyote crate engine . This “Aluminator” engine is a 5.0L Four-Valve unit with an 11:1 compression ratio and comes complete with a manual transmission engine injector harness. Lamb Fab pulled the existing engine and started working to fit the wider, modular Ford V-8 under the hood. The work required modifications to the fenderwells, front cowl, steering shaft, and front driveshaft along will all the other usual changes that have to be made when a different engine is swapped in.  Front Runner Pulley system

For this swap, the Coyote engine was mated to a six-speed auto. This in turn was adapted to the existing Dana 20 transfer case that has a twin-stick shifter setup.

trans-adapter

Follow along as we detail some of the tasks needed to complete this swap. The results are impressive to say the least. With 435-plus horsepower on tap, there are plenty of ponies to make this Bronco move rapidly. With backing of the six-speed, the engine is always in powerband and drivability is awesome, especially when compared to the older three-speed C4 auto it had previously. It is supersmooth now.

The complete powertrain is temporarily assembled for test fitting. It is a clean setup adapting modern to vintage for this classic Ford. The six-speed auto transmission In the final configuration, driveshaft lengths were unchanged. However, some mods were made to the front driveshaft to clear the larger transmission. No CV joint was used, but high-angle U-joints were needed.

An adapter  was sourced to mate the modern auto transmission to the Dana 20 that was already in the Bronco. Multiple bolt holes on the adapter allow for numerous clocking configurations to place the t-case at almost any angle relative to the transmission.

To best mate the engine to the Bronco framerails and make moving the engine in and out easier, an engine cradle were fabbed under the oil pan that bolts to full-metal engine mount plates using urethane bushings. The cradle then sits in a set of pocket brackets on the framerails. Determining the final engine placement took some time to ensure that the hood, radiator, and firewall clearances were maintained.

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Ford Racing headers were used but modified a bit to fit around the inner fenders and steering shaft.  Cut off and reworked some of the tubes as needed.

bronco-headers

The Coyote engine computer itself monitors water temperature and oil pressure.  Autometer gauges used in dash. The mechanical water temp sensor was plumbed into one of the heater ports on the new engine.

Since the Coyote engine was primarily designed for late-model Mustangs that use electric power steering, no steering pump is provided on the engine. Use of a Vintage Air Front Runner Setup includes the Power Steering Pump.

As work progressed, the engine was placed in and pulled out of the engine bay a number of times for fit checks. The Coyote engine is a good bit wider across the cylinder heads than the older 302 V-8 it replaces.The Bronco uses a 1980s Ford 2WD steering box and a Borgeson shaft. The position of the Ididit steering column had to be modified, as did the inner fender panel in order to push the steering shaft a bit more to the driver side to clear the wider engine. You can also see the beginning of a frame mount to capture the engine cradle

The shop fabricated this simple, high-clearance mount for the adapter at the end of the transmission. It mates with two pairs of tabs on the inner framerails and attaches with two bolts.

Coyote 5.0 Bronco Engine Swap Radiator

The radiator is from a late-model Thunderbird; it is very slim and packaged well. The Coyote engines are quite thermally efficient, so very large volumes of coolant aren’t needed. A 60-plus-psi inline electric pump was installed along the framerail to feed fuel to the new engine.

 Coyote 5.0 Bronco Engine Swap Radiator Filler Hoses Neck

The radiator is a closed-style, having no top radiator cap. An inline radiator fill assembly was used, simply spliced into the upper radiator hose. Hoses are late-model Mustang pieces. All hoses were secured with heat-shrink hose clamps.

Coyote 5.0l Bronco Engine Swap Radiator Steam Line

These modern motors usually require a cooling system steam line. In this case it was run with a rubber hose to a connection at the top of the radiator. This radiator also had an integrated cooler for the transmission fluid with inlet and outlet connections.

Coyote 5.0l Bronco Engine Swap Transmission Lines

A set of factory Ford steel fluid lines was mated to the automatic transmission and routed forward. They were cut off just forward of the crank pulley, and compression fittings were used to adapt to rubber lines leading to the cooler integrated in the radiator. Also tucked up on the bottom side of the engine is an OEM Ford starter. Wiring was straightforward, and the existing Bronco connections were all used on the new starter.

Coyote 5.0l Bronco Engine Swap Power Steering Reservoir

A remote power steering reservoir from a late-model Mustang was mounted up near the cowl on the passenger side along with a small cooler for the steering system. Low- and high-pressure pump lines were custom fabricated and run from the pump on the passenger side to the steering box on the driver side.

 Coyote 5.0 Bronco Engine Swap Shifter

auto shifter from the 2013 F-150 that’s designed to work with the six-speed transmission. Functions include manual tap-shift capability and tow/haul mode selection. The shop fabricated a metal console to mount and house the shifter, then had it covered in bedliner material to match the interior floor of the Bronco.

Coyote 5.0 Bronco Engine Swap Transfer Case Shifter

The transfer case shifter assembly was custom fabricated. The shifter mount is bolted to a tab point on the new transmission.

Coyote 5.0l Bronco Engine Swap Accelerator Pedal

The Coyote engine control uses signals from a drive-by-wire throttle assembly so no mechanical throttle cable routing is necessary. Installed an accelerator pedal assembly from a 2013 F-150.

 5.0 Coyote Bronco Engine Swap Battery Computer Harness Fuse Box

A Ford Racing engine harness was used along with the engine computer. It was programmed  and sits on the passenger-side wheelwell just ahead of the battery. These units are designed to survive heat and vibration under the hood, so mounting here is no problem. A Bussman fuse box on the inner fender provides overcurrent protection and cleans up the power supply wiring.

5.0l Coyote Bronco Engine Swap Radiator Cowl Photo

Along with using the slim radiator with the new engine, cut out much of the original cowl.  then bridged the area with a new crossmember that preserves the strength but is much more compact.

5.0 Coyote Bronco Engine Swap

The air intake was put together from generic air intake fittings, and a large Spectre open element filter was isolated in a cold air box. The finished engine swap looks superclean sitting in the Bronco. It fits, but there’s very little leftover airspace under the hood.

SOURCES

Lamb Fab

 

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Supercharger Basics

edelbrock-Supercharger

Supercharger Basics

The development of supercharging has a long history, with surprisingly diverse applications. In 1860, the Roots brothers developed an air pump with a pair of meshing lobes for use in blast furnaces, and this type of blower found its way onto an engine designed by Gottlieb Daimler in 1900, making it the oldest of the various superchargers available.
Later on, veterans returning from WWII were inspired by the superchargers on fighter planes to hop up their hot rods. Today, this type of forced induction is now a staple of the performance aftermarket. There’s no quicker way to pull big power out of an engine than bolting on a blower. Gains of 30 to 50 percent and even more are not unusual, depending on the fuel delivery, octane and intercooling systems.
The principle behind supercharging is fairly simple: use a belt-driven pump to push more air into the cylinders so the engine can burn more fuel and generate more power. The devil’s in the details, though, since superchargers come in a variety of sizes and configurations. They also often require modifications to the intake, fuel and cooling systems, along with reprogramming the engine computer.
The basic types of blowers are Roots, twin-screw and centrifugal. As noted above, the Roots pulls air through a pair of meshing lobes (as does the twin-screw, but in a different configuration). While traditionally thought of as the least fuel-efficient type, the Roots has been refined by Eaton Corporation by using three- or four-lobe rotors, among other changes.

Roots Supercharger
These include twisting each rotor 60 degrees to form a helix, along with improved geometry for the inlet and outlet ports, reducing pressure variations, resulting in a smoother discharge of air for higher efficiency over traditional Roots superchargers.
The twin-screw type, offered by both Kenne Bell and Whipple, might look visually similar to the Roots type (both are usually mounted on top of the intake manifold), and is also a positive displacement unit (the amount of airflow pumped per rpm is fixed), but the internals are significantly different.
Using “male” and “female” rotors that turn in opposite directions, the twin-screw compresses the air between the rotors (rather than around the rotors, next to the blower case). The advantages of this design, Kenne Bell notes, include less turbulence, heat and friction, along with higher boost levels.

Kenney Belle SC

Kenne Bell introduced the twin-screw concept to Ford Mustangs in 1990, and employs it on a number of other engines, including both the GM LS V8s and the Chrysler Hemi. As mentioned, it’s a positive displacement design that produces the same cfm output and boost at any rpm — not just peak rpm. The 10 psi kit for the 2011 to ’14 Mustang GT increases power by 225 to 250 hp (approximately 20 hp/psi boost), depending on fuel octane (91 or 93).
Supercharger displacement choices are not limited to the smaller 2.3 OEM rotors. The much larger and powerful twin-screw sizes of 2.8, 3, 3.2, 3.6, 4.2 and 4.7 liters cover a power range of 725 to 1,800 hp. All superchargers utilize the same exclusive 4×6 lobe rotor concept that holds all those horsepower and track records.
The twin screw’s big, fat torque curve in the low and middle range, coupled to maximum peak horsepower and rpm, are the main reasons why the twin-screw concept has become so popular with both the aftermarket and OEMs.
In addition, to minimize supercharger inlet and boost restriction, Kenne Bell utilizes the industry’s largest throttle body (168 mm) and inlet system. This feature alone is worth 30 to 50 hp, the company claims. Also, the cooler air charge and patented Liquid Cooling ensure the lowest possible air charge temps for higher air density and thus more power. Finally, the twin-screw concept uses less engine power to drive it, resulting in lower parasitic losses and more power to the rear wheels.

The third basic type of supercharger, the centrifugal, is much smaller in size. It uses an impeller or compressor wheel spinning as fast as 50,000 rpm to draw air in and then force it out radially into a circular scroll. Since this configuration is similar to a turbocharger, the centrifugal supercharger has been described as a belt-driven turbocharger. (Turbos are driven by exhaust gasses.)

centrifugal-sc
One advantage of a centrifugal unit is in the package size, since it can fit under the hood as part of the accessory drive system, usually with no changes in the bodywork, except perhaps to redirect the airflow more efficiently. Another significant difference from positive displacement blowers is that the centrifugal unit provides less boost pressure at low engine speeds. (Which can be an advantage, since no piston modifications are required to prevent engine knock.)

On the other hand, since a centrifugal unit’s airflow is not fixed and increases with the square of its shaft rpm, it really comes alive at higher engine revs. So an engine with a centrifugal blower might feel stock at first, but gets bigger as you go faster. It sometimes seems like the speedometer rises quicker than the tach. Several popular makes of centrifugal superchargers include Paxton, Powerdyne, ProCharger, Rotrex and Vortech.
Which type of supercharger is right for your engine and vehicle? That will depend on a number of variables, but generally speaking, a centrifugal supercharger is ideal for a quick-revving, lighter vehicle with a manual transmission, while the positive displacement blower excels on a larger vehicle with an automatic transmission.
Both types can produce prodigious amounts of power, but at different areas of the power band. When looking at a supercharger, one shouldn’t be concerned only with peak horsepower numbers. Unlike race cars, performance cars aren’t driven frequently at the peak power range, so that can be a misleading figure.

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Whatever the type, all superchargers benefit from the use of an intercooler to reduce heat during compression. A decrease in air intake temperature (using either an air-to-air or air-to-liquid heat exchanger) provides a denser intake charge to the engine and allows more air and fuel to be combusted per engine cycle, increasing the output of the

engine. In addition, a cooler intake charge allows for higher boost levels without detonation for more power.
Of course, to keep up with a higher airflow, the fuel system needs to be modified. On an EFI engine, that usually means bigger injectors and reprogramming of the engine computer. The condition and mileage on the engine should be evaluated as well, to make sure the internals can withstand higher cylinder pressures. Also, when you add boost to an engine you are essentially adding compression. Regardless of supercharger style, there is a boost limit with 92- to 93-octane pump gas before detonation occurs, resulting in engine damage. So be wary of huge horsepower claims on pump gas, since they’re simply not sustainable within the detonation limits of most production engines.

 

Article Courtesy of Reincarmagazine.

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Why LS Engines are Too Awesome

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Why LS Engines are Too Awesome

Development for the 3rd Generation engines by Chevy began after the short-lived LT1/LT4 engines which in the year 1992 to 1997 that failed to meet GM’s expectation.

General Motors then created Generation 3rd V-8 engine that has replaced a small-block LT1/LT4 platform.

After that Generation 3rd LS1 engines designed by GM showcased modern engine technology retaining traditional valve mechanical system. This engine was first appeared in Corvette 1997. After that whole series of high performance engines followed it.

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-1

In the last 10 years,

The LS engine exploded the market and we see them nestled between all show cars to all racing cars.

There are some reasons for this!

Their downward price and the market continued to make their transplants into all variety of vehicles with the fact that they are not simply going away.

So,

Whether you are planning to drop this magical engine into your legendary ride or you are buying a car for your college going child. I want to give a small introduction about them, focusing on the part that why LS engines are called GREAT in hot road culture!

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-2

What is an Engine??

It is just an air pump.

Air goes in, fuel added, mixture blows up and horsepower happens. Vroom-Vroom…

We all have heard some shorts about this technology on how engine works. But, the process is not quite easy as I have explained in one sentence. There are lots of processes undergoes inside the engine. And these

LS engines add quite more to advance these processes.

For starters,

The pistons are made up of alloys that are more stronger and more thermally stable than the cast iron pistons used in Generation 1 engines. These pistons are fitted with a thinner metal ring packs that reduces friction and also helps bore sealing.

Coming to the connecting rods, LS platforms use powder-forged design. They have cracked cap providing irregular mating surface allowing rod to align precisely with a large end, helping equalize bearing wear. They are very much stronger than production rods used earlier.

why-LS-engines-are-too-awesome-3

LS crankshafts are tough pieces with relocated thrust bearings have been proven to quadruple horsepower outputs.

So till now, I have established that the bottom end to this engine has got few things which are different from traditional small blocks. So, why to change SBC engine combo for few things when bottom end is less than $1000? It doesn’t make sense.

Now, here comes the master piece of LS engines…

The master piece of LS family engines is the cylinder head and valve mechanics components. This is what makes LS engines to deliver outstanding performance with few changes made.

The head of the engine is designed with a 15 degrees valve angle.

Research about a 15 degree small block head and you’ll come to know about the biggest win for the LS engines. In addition to improved geometrical valve design, the LS engines have replicated ports. Something different from Gen 1’s mirrored port configuration that have different runner sizing for cylinders 3 & 5, 4 & 6.

The new LS engine style allows every runner to be more symmetrical and gives every cylinder equal opportunity for airflow. The ported LS heads have proven to move over 300cfm of air.

The valve mechanism design for LS engines retains the pushroads. No more pinning rocker studs, or adding rocker girdles. The LS valvetrain is 7000 rpm capable right out. Engineers also integrated beehive springs which reduces overall valvetrain mass.

One more thing!

With LS, there’s no need to spend $1,000 on a retrofit kit.

Conclusion

I can go more on and on LS engines but till now you probably get the point that why LS engine are great stuff. But you are still hanging on Gen I small block death grip.

Not yet ready???

Just fine. Knowing that there is some better options available in the market can’t reduce the things we love.

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Atomic EFI get C.A.R.B. approval

Atomic EFI Fuel Injection

Atomic EFI get C.A.R.B. approval

MSD Performance  Atomic Fuel Injection System  has been granted an Executive Order Number from the California Air Resources Board. This E.O. Number makes the Atomic the only aftermarket EFI system that is legal on 1987 and older GM vehicles in California. The Atomic EFI system received E.O. Number D-722 which permits the system to be installed in place of the factory carburetor on 1987 and older  passenger cars and trucks originally powered by a V8 engine. This Executive Order also means the Atomic EFI system provides “reasonable basis” for satisfying the anti-tampering requirements of the Federal Clean Air Act, thus allowing its use in all other states. This is terrific news for enthusiasts with an ’87 and older  car or truck as it means they can finally do away with their old carburetor and take advantage of the driveability benefits of a modern, self-learning EFI system such as quick starts, consistent idle and smooth power throughout all driving conditions. MSD will supply an information label with the E.O. Number and details that must be affixed on the vehicle for inspection purposes. Great news for all you Hot Rodders and Replica cars that faced restrictions with Emmisions.

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Welcome to TD Motion’s Blog Page

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Welcome to TD Motion’s Blog Page

We’re finally getting operations up and running along with the website.
Plenty of Posts to come.  Stay Tuned!!

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